We Can Make It! Photos of Wolverhampton 1975-1985

Wolverhampton, home of Slade, Robert Plant, Enoch Powell and England football captain Billy Wright, is a Midlands city of around a quarter of a million people.

Wolverhampton

Railway Street, April 1975

Wolverhampton, home of Slade, Robert Plant, Enoch Powell and England football captain Billy Wright, is situated northwest of its larger near-neighbour Birmingham, is a city of around a quarter of a million people. The centre of Wolverhampton has been altered radically since the mid-1960s, with the Mander Centre (plans for which were unveiled on 15 April 1965)[56] being opened in two phases, the first in 1968 and the second in 1971. Several refurbishments have taken place since. The Wulfrun Centre, an open shopping area, was opened alongside the Mander Centre’s first phase in 1968, but has been undercover since a roof was added in the late 1990s.

Wolverhampton

We Can Make It, April 1984

Wolverhampton

The Posada, December 1983

Wolverhampton

The Royal Oak, Compton Road, July 1977

Wolverhampton

Tipton Gasworks – the junction of Alexandra Road and Locarno Road, 10th February 1980

Wolverhampton

School Street, February 1978

Wolverhampton

Queen Street, 1979

Wolverhampton

Pedestrians crossing the junction of Darlington Street and Red Lion Street on 30th May 1984.

Wolverhampton

Darlington Street, 1979

Wolverhampton

junction of Lord Street and Merridale Road on 8th June 1980

Wolverhampton

Prosser Street, Park Village, November 1983

Wolverhampton

Fowler’s Park, April 1975

Hordern Road, May 1984

Wolverhampton

Cleveland Street, November 1980

Wolverhampton

Clarendon Hotel, December 1977

Wolverhampton

Chapel Ash, September 1976

Bushbury, June 1982

Wolverhampton

At the junction of North Street and Queen Square, with the town hall in the background. 3rd June 1985

Anti-racist demonstrators, March 1978

Chelsea Football Fans, May 1977

Wolverhampton

Junction of Darlington Street and Red Lion Street, May 1984

The Victoria Street entrance to Wolverhampton’s shopping precinct, the Mander Centre, with Beattie’s department store opposite. 5th April 1975.

Wolverhampton

Queen Square, April 1975

Wolverhampton

Junction of Victoria Street and Queen Square on 23rd July 1986.

The True Briton, Bilston Street, on 25th February 1979

Wolverhampton

Office workers returning to work after lunch. Darlington Street, 30th May 1984

A group of policemen wait on Wolverhampton ring road prior to the passing of an anti-racist demonstration procession. 11th March 1978

Wolverhampton, June 1980

Wolverhampton, March 1979 Overturned car at the Ring Road: Chapel Ash roundabout

Wolverhampton

Cleveland Street, 11th March 1978.

Anti-racist demonstrators assemble in Cleveland Road, Wolverhampton, prior to marching through the town centre. 11th March 1978

Corner shop at the junction of Waterloo Road and Staveley Road, Wolverhampton on 28th December 1980.

Lord Street, June 1980

Wolverhampton

Riches Street, February 1981

Wolverhampton

June 1983 Wulfruna Street

More of David Rostance’s fascinating photographs can be found on his Flickr site and are much recommended.