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The Saucy Seaside Postcard: A Gallery Of Smut, Sex And Suggestiveness

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Let’s looks back at the British saucy seaside postcard, including works by Phil Millar (Pedro) – he would have painted the pictures which then would become postcards – and artist Donald McGill, the artists whose work was banned by the Seaside Authorities for being ‘‘too suggestive”.

The more vulgar the smut– the more laden with double entendre and hideous the people featured; the more garish and rough the picture – the better. These postcards were created when sex was not a product of the corporate marketing department but something exotic other people did.

 

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An original set of saucy seaside paintings which inspired hundreds of politically incorrect post cards are expected to fetch thousands of pounds when they are auctioned off 11 AUG 2009See SWNS Story SWCARD The 25 risqu paintings by Phil Millar nicknamed Pedro were the original designs for the popular Carry On postcard series which were sold in thousands of seaside shops during the 1960s and 1970s. Incredibly, the pristine water colours pictures measuring 19cm by 27cm were almost lost forever when they were dumped in a skip in Calne, Wilts., in 1989.

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