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The League of Nations: A Pictoral Survey 1925

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The 1st meeting of the League of Nations

The 1st meeting of the League of Nations

 

Published in 1925, The League of Nations: A Pictoral Survey would educate the great unwashed as to the purpose of the League, the body established on 10 January 1920 to ensure a world war never occurred again; to ensure a peaceful world order. Produced by the propaganda ministry, aka the Information Section of the League Secretariat, the booklet detailed the various hierarchy – Assembly, Council, and Permanent Secretariat—and introduced such outfits as the International Labour Organisation and the Permanent Court of International Justice. The League was superseded by the United Nations in 1946.

 

British diplomat and former prime minister Arthur Balfour (1848 - 1930) addressing the first meeting of the Council of the League of Nations in Geneva, November 15, 1920. From left to right - Dimitrios Kaklamanos of Greece, Keishiro Matsui (1868 - 1946) of Japan, Balfour, Leon Bourgeois (1851 - 1925) of France, Maggiorino Ferraris of Italy, Paul Hymans (1865 - 1941) of Belgium, and Jose Maria Quinones de Leon of Spain. The League of Nations first met on 15th November 1920 with representatives from 42 countries. The League had 32 constant members throughout its 20 year existence but 63 nations took part in various assemblies. The League of Nations was eventually superseded by the United Naitons.  (Photo by A. R. Coster/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

British diplomat and former prime minister Arthur Balfour (1848 – 1930) addressing the first meeting of the Council of the League of Nations in Geneva, November 15, 1920. From left to right – Dimitrios Kaklamanos of Greece, Keishiro Matsui (1868 – 1946) of Japan, Balfour, Leon Bourgeois (1851 – 1925) of France, Maggiorino Ferraris of Italy, Paul Hymans (1865 – 1941) of Belgium, and Jose Maria Quinones de Leon of Spain. The League of Nations first met on 15th November 1920 with representatives from 42 countries. The League had 32 constant members throughout its 20 year existence but 63 nations took part in various assemblies. The League of Nations was eventually superseded by the United Naitons. (Photo by A. R. Coster/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

 

 

The League of Nations: A Pictoral Survey is a small book, published in 192

 

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A flow chart on page nine shows the relationship between the executive and legislative bodies of the League and the specialized committees responsible for addressing such issues as refugee resettlement, health, and disarmament.

The publication highlights what were regarded as League successes, including the mandate system used to administer territories formerly belonging to the Ottoman and German empires, the resolution of post-World War I refugee problems in Eastern Europe, and measures to afford international protection to minorities in certain League states.

 

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