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George Orwell Castigates American Fashion Magazines And The Thin-Boned Lizard Women Within (1946)

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George Orwell - an seiner Schreibmaschine

 

In November 1946, George Orwell direted As I Please column for Britain’s Tribune against an “American fashion magazine which shall be nameless”.  Other topics Owell tackled included: “You and the atom bomb”, “The sporting spirit”, “Books v cigarettes”, “Decline of the English Murder” and “Some Thoughts on the Common Toad”.

 

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But fashion had gotten beneath his skin:

Someone has just sent me a copy of an American fashion magazine which shall be nameless. It consists of 325 large quarto pages, of which no less than 15 are given up to articles on world politics, literature, etc. The rest consists entirely of pictures with a little letterpress creeping round their edges: pictures of ball dresses, mink coats, step-ins, panties, brassières, silk stockings, slippers, perfumes, lipsticks, nail polish—and, of course, of the women, unrelievedly beautiful, who wear them or make use of them.

Who can forget the Vogue magazine article on Asma al-Assad, wife of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. As Arab regimes tumbled, Assad bombed his countrymen and jihadis roamed the plains, Vogue wrote of the First Lady’s “thin, long-limbed beauty with a trained analytic mind who dresses with cunning understatement”.

 

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Orwell never read that, of course, but in 1946 he had already seen enough:

I do not know just how many drawings or photographs of women occur throughout the whole volume, but as there are 45 of them, all beautiful, in the first 50 pages, one can work it out roughly. One striking thing when one looks at these pictures is the overbred, exhausted, even decadent style of beauty that now seems to be striven after. Nearly all of these women are immensely elongated. A thin-boned, ancient-Egyptian type of face seems to predominate: narrow hips are general, and slender non-prehensile hands like those of a lizard are everywhere. Evidently it is a real physical type, for it occurs as much in the photographs as in the drawings. Another striking thing is the prose style of the advertisements, an extraordinary mixture of sheer lushness with clipped and sometimes very expressive technical jargon. Words like suave-mannered, custom-finished, contour-conforming, mitt-back, innersole, backdip, midriff, swoosh, swash, curvaceous, slenderize and pet-smooth are flung about with evident full expectation that the reader will understand them at a glance. Here are a few sample sentences taken at random:

‘A new Shimmer Sheen colour that sets your hands and his head in a whirl.’ ‘Bared and beautifully bosomy.’ ‘Feathery-light Milliken Fleece to keep her kitten-snug!’ ‘Others see you through a veil of sheer beauty, and they wonder why!’ ‘Gentle discipline for curves in lacy lastex pantie-girdle,’ ‘An exclamation point of a dress that depends on fluid fabric for much of its drama.’ ‘Suddenly your figure lifts . . . lovely in the litheness of a Foundette pantie-girdle.’ ‘Lovely to look at, lovelier to wear is this original Lady Duff gown with its shirred cap sleeves and accentuated midriff .’ ‘Supple and tissue-light, yet wonderfully curve-holding.’ ‘The miracle of figure flattery!’ ‘Moulds your bosom into proud feminine lines.’ ‘Isn’t it wonderful to know that Corsees wash and wear and whittle you down . . . . even though they weigh only four ounces!’ ‘The distilled witchery of one woman who was forever desirable . . . forever beloved . . . Forever Amber.’ And so on and so on and so on.

 

LIGHT AS A BUBBLE is just the way you’ll feel in this freedom-loving Foundette. Munsingwear carefully combines light leno with satin Lastex to slim your tummy…to round your hips…to make you feel small…to look wonderful when new clothes call for young, smooth curves. The Munsingwear bra does its bewitching bit, too.”

LIGHT AS A BUBBLE is just the way you’ll feel in this freedom-loving Foundette. Munsingwear carefully combines light leno with satin Lastex to slim your tummy…to round your hips…to make you feel small…to look wonderful when new clothes call for young, smooth curves. The Munsingwear bra does its bewitching bit, too.”

 

A fairly diligent search through the magazine reveals two discreet allusions to grey hair, but if there is anywhere a direct mention of fatness or middle age I have not found it. Birth and death are not mentioned either: nor is work, except that a few recipes for breakfast dishes are given. The male sex enters directly or indirectly into perhaps one advertisement in twenty, and photographs of dogs or kittens appear here and there. In only two pictures, out of about three hundred, is a child represented.

On the front cover there is a coloured photograph of the usual elegant female standing on a chair while a grey-haired, spectacled, crushed-looking man in shirt-sleeves kneels at her feet, doing something to the edge of her skirt. If one looks closely one finds that actually he is about to take a measurement with a yard-measure. But to a casual glance he looks as though he were kissing the hem of the woman’s garment—not a bad symbolical picture of American civilization, or at least of one important side of it.

Via: New RepublicOrwell in ‘Tribune’, Telelib