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“Each Mouthful is a Caress” – Wall’s Ice Cream Ads from the 1950s

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Wall's Ice Cream advert

1950 All Meals are Gay with Wall’s Ice Cream!

Wall’s is now is an ice cream brand owned by the Anglo-Dutch food and personal care conglomerate Unilever. But it was once a family business founded 230 years ago in 1786 by Richard Wall when he opened a butcher’s stall in St James’s Market in London.

Every summer, in those pre-refrigeration days, the company had to lay off staff as demand for sausages, pies and meat fell, so in 1913 Thomas Wall II conceived the idea of making ice cream to avoid those lay-offs. The First World War meant that his idea was not implemented until 1922 but that year a man called Maxwell Holt was put in charge of producing ice cream, with near instant success and Ice cream production commenced in the same year at a factory in Acton, London.

There is a garage on the corner of Aultone Way and Angel Hill in Benhilton, Sutton, London, built in about 1913 and still in use today, which was originally used for the storing of the ‘Stop Me and Buy One’ bicycles of Thomas Wall’s business.

Wall’s now is an ice cream brand owned by the Anglo-Dutch food and personal care conglomerate Unilever.

 

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1959

Take home a family brick.

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1954

Wrapped up in a newspaper in the shop it will still be just right for eating 2 or 3 hours later!

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1952

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1952

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1957

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1952

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1955

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1956

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1955

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1954

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1957

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1957

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1956

Wall's Ice Cream advert

1956

  • I remember the bloody useless soggy cardboard brick packaging that would fall apart as soon as you served some. Please tell me nobody packages ice cream this way anymore.

  • sampoerna quatrain

    As an American, am I missing something about British Ice Cream? You can wrap it in newspapers, and it stays “firm” for 3 hours? Maybe it’s made out of actual bricks?

  • bjcolby15

    @sampoernaquatrain:disqus I figure the “family brick” was equivalent to an American half-gallon, the brick to an American quart, and a tub to an American pint. No bricks were used to make the ice cream.

    @tedmills:disqus Ice cream companies use tubs with covers to package the ice cream. The major companies also shrink out some of the ice cream (“shrinkflation”) to maintain a profit; supermarket brands often keep faithful to the actual sizes described above. (And yes, it was a pain in the neck on a hot, sweltering day to wrestle with the bricks that couldn’t stay shut, offering freezer burn and off-tastes.)

  • sampoerna quatrain

    @bjcolby15:disqus So maybe it’s British newspapers that have magical properties, and not the ice cream?