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1943: Bizarre American Locomotive Company Advert

By on 28 April 2014 | comments 0

IN 1943, The American Locomotive Company published this advert:

 

American-Locomotive-Advert 1943

 

 

The Nazis look upon us as a degenerate nation. But they have a great respect for our accomplishments. And, if they win, they may decide that we have something in our blood which can use in building their master race.

For they’re great believers in eugenics, these Nazis. They’re strong for selective breeding. You they may cast aside and put to some ignominious task, such as scrubbing the sidewalks or sweeping the streets. But your daughter…well, if she’s young and healthy and  strong, a Gauleiter with an eye for beauty may decide she’s a perfect specimen for one of their experimental camps.

A high honour for your daughter….

Does this seem a story spun the realm of fantasy? It isn’t. It is now happening, all through Europe. The latest experiment of the victorious Nazis has been to ship Austrian and Hungarian girls to  the Northern countries. The result of these unions…unblessed, of course, by matrimony…will not be know for some time. But the Nazis, you must admit, are not above innovation.

Two, three, four, five years from now they may ship American girls to some far corner of the earth…may select your daughter…if you relax, if you fail to do your part now. If you say, hopefully, “It can’t happen here. We can’t loose.”

No, we can’t lose. We can’t afford to. We must not. Else all the terrors , all the degradation, all the misery  and suffering that have been loosed upon Europe will be loosed upon us. We of all people will not escape it. We shall be the chosen… we shall be the select…in the Nazi scheme of things.

We who have only just begun to win. We who risk the danger of resting on our new-won laurels and considering the job done.

This is not time to relax. This is the time…the opportune time…to do all we can to get this war over sooner.

We must measure up to the job.

Spotter: Debold American Gallery